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The Sports Daily > Cards Diaspora
This Is What .500 Looks Like

I’m going to show you something and I promise you it’s real.

Ready?

Ok, here is a screengrab of just some (not all) of injuries that have befallen the NY Mets in 2017:

If these weren’t actual ailments to actual people in 2017, it would be comical. I cut this list off… there are more here if you’d like to take a look.

Considered to be viable playoff contenders before the season started, the Mets have lost 50 games in 2017 and are looking ahead to 2018.

The Cardinals have lost 49 games. 1 fewer than the Mets.

+++++

You’re a good fan. I’m a good fan. We’re all good fans.

Of COURSE we see a less than a 6 game gap between the Cardinals and first place in the NL Central as a manageable achievement. Something doable. We have no desire to throw in the towel on the summer and start looking forward to next season with this one still seemingly, tantalizingly close to having playoff potential.

But that’s what .500 teams do.

They make you see things that aren’t there. Give you just enough evidence to make a case either way.

During the same series, there’s this:

And there’s this:

In the end?

2 wins. 2 losses. Nothing to show on the ledger other than 4 games had been contested.

And – unfortunately – this swinging pendulum isn’t going to land anything of value to the team or to you as a supporter.

Average doesn’t get you into the playoffs and the thrills of October games. It doesn’t get you super premium draft picks and the hope of future stars prepping to get the big league call-up… it gets you nothing.

162 shoulder shrugs.

+++++

95 games ins’t a small sample size for a team. 257 if you want to count 2016.

It’s time for the Cardinals to make bold moves.

If they want to acquire some players and make a legit run at the division? Go for it. If they want to trade their assets for building blocks and draft picks while turning the page on ’17? Fine.

Being middled, though?

Nah.

I’ve personally had my fill in ’16 & ’17

You?

Photo: Priceonomics