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Four Crucial Tips for Parents Looking to Support Their Child Athlete

When your kid falls in love with a sport, it’s incredibly difficult to tear them away from the game, isn’t it?

Whether you’ve convinced your child to get involved in school sports or they’ve decided on their own that they love the thrill of competition, your support as a parent is paramount. Even if your kid doesn’t plan on growing up to be a sports superstar, taking an active role in your child’s journey as an athlete should be a top priority.

From keeping your kid safe to letting them know that you’re there from an emotional standpoint, consider the following four must-do’s for the sake of your child.

Monitor Them Medically

It doesn’t matter what sport your child might be playing: from football and soccer to cheerleading and beyond, injuries are incredibly common for young athletes. However, it’s not just bruises and scrapes that plague kids on the field. Concussions, asthma attacks and other conditions that have the potential to sneak up on children are likewise to be expected.

As a result, you need to make sure that you monitor your child medically and swiftly deal with any potential medical issues before they occur. For example, if your child has asthma you may want to look into discounts on an Advair prescription to prevent a potential attack and give yourself peace of mind. The more preventative measures you take to monitor your child’s health, the better.

Either way, don’t push your child too hard to the point where they could injure or hurt themselves. If they aren’t having fun, what’s the purpose of being a child athlete, anyway?

Don’t Be “That” Parent

On a related note, always be complimentary of your child versus critical when it comes to their performance on the field. 90% of parents probably already follow this rule and understand the importance of positive feedback for their child’s personal and emotional development. That said, there are those parents out there who use their kids’ sporting performance as an excuse to be needlessly critical.

Breaking down your kid concerning their physical attributes or sports performance doesn’t do anything to help your child or strengthen your relationship. Remember: at the end of the day a game is just a game.

Go to Their Games

Although this tip might seem rather obvious, you can’t overlook the need for parents to “be there” for their children and their public activities. Seeing your face in the crowd can make all the difference to your kid, even if they don’t say so.

Helping your kids get from Point A to Point B in terms of games and practices is a major plus. If you have trouble getting out of work to catch your kids’ games, don’t be afraid to speak to your boss or try making an arrangement with your coworkers or spouse to make sure that someone from your family is present to watch your child play.

Support Your Child’s Other Interests

Despite popular belief, children are allowed to have multiple interests and hobbies. If your child expresses interest beyond the world of sports, let’s say in academics or technology, be supportive of change just as you would support their love of being an athlete. Always present your kids with the option to do what makes them happy: you never know how your child might grow and surprise you with diverse interests that make them a more well-rounded person.

These tips signal that you’re a supportive figure for your kid on the field, always looking out for your child’s physical and mental well-being. If you want to be the best parent you can possibly be for your child athlete, you’ve already got the right mentality.