TAMPA, FL - FEBRUARY 01:  James Harrison #92 of the Pittsburgh Steelers scores a touchdown after running back an interception for 100 yards in the second quarter against the Arizona Cardinals during Super Bowl XLIII on February 1, 2009 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

Remembering the longest plays in Super Bowl history

In the lead up to Super Bowl 50 between the Carolina Panthers and Denver Broncos, The Sports Daily will be remembering some of the most iconic moments and players from Super Bowl history.

Our series starts with the longest plays in the impressive history of the NFL’s biggest game:

HOUSTON - FEBRUARY 1:  Wide receiver Muhsin Muhammad #87 of the Carolina Panthers evades cornerback Eugene Wilson #26 of the New England Patriots during Super Bowl XXXVIII at Reliant Stadium on February 1, 2004 in Houston, Texas.  The Patriots defeated the Panthers 32-29.  (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

HOUSTON – FEBRUARY 1: Wide receiver Muhsin Muhammad #87 of the Carolina Panthers evades cornerback Eugene Wilson #26 of the New England Patriots during Super Bowl XXXVIII at Reliant Stadium on February 1, 2004 in Houston, Texas. The Patriots defeated the Panthers 32-29. (Photo by Brian Bahr/Getty Images)

Longest Pass: Jake Delhomme to Muhsin Muhammad, Carolina Panthers (85 yards)

Jake Delhomme is widely remembered for his playoff meltdown in Jan. of 2009, when he threw five interceptions and the No. 1 seeded Panthers lost to the Arizona Cardinals in the NFC Divisional Round. But he’s also owner of the longest touchdown pass in Super Bowl history.

Delhomme gave the Panthers their first lead of Super Bowl XXXVIII when he bought time to his left and found Muhsin Muhammad behind the Patriots’ coverage for an 85-yard score—breaking the record previously held by Brett Favre and Antonio Freeman (81). Carolina took the lead, 22-21, but eventually lost to New England on an Adam Vinatieri field goal with four seconds left.

Steelers Willie Parker runs for a touchdown during Super Bowl XL between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Seattle Seahawks at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan on February 5, 2006. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/NFLPhotoLibrary)

Steelers Willie Parker runs for a touchdown during Super Bowl XL between the Pittsburgh Steelers and Seattle Seahawks at Ford Field in Detroit, Michigan on February 5, 2006. (Photo by Mike Ehrmann/NFLPhotoLibrary)

Longest Run: Willie Parker, Pittsburgh Steelers (75 yards)

Once one of the fastest running backs in the NFL, Willie Parker used his electrifying speed to give the Steelers a comfortable cushion early in the second half of Pittsburgh’s Super XL win over the Seattle Seahawks.

On the second play of the third quarter, Parker took a handoff from Ben Roethlisberger, made one cut back to his left and sprinted the rest of the way to the end zone for six points. The play covered 75 yards and gave the Steelers a 14-3 lead. Parker finished with a team-high 93 yards rushing, helping Jerome “The Bus” Bettis get his first and only Super Bowl ring.

TAMPA, FL - FEBRUARY 01:  James Harrison #92 of the Pittsburgh Steelers runs back an interception for a touchdown in the second quarter against the Arizona Cardinals during Super Bowl XLIII on February 1, 2009 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida.  (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

TAMPA, FL – FEBRUARY 01: James Harrison #92 of the Pittsburgh Steelers runs back an interception for a touchdown in the second quarter against the Arizona Cardinals during Super Bowl XLIII on February 1, 2009 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. (Photo by Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Longest Interception Return: James Harrison, Pittsburgh Steelers (100 yards)

Three years after Parker’s long run helped the Steelers win a Super Bowl, James Harrison’s pick-six as the first half expired paved the way for a return of the Lombardi Trophy to Pittsburgh. Kurt Warner and the Arizona Cardinals were driving for the go-ahead points of Super Bowl XLIII, but Harrison stepped in from of Warner’s pass at the goal line and returned the interception 100 yards for a touchdown.

The 275-pound linebacker rumbled through tacklers and only just found the end zone with zero time left on the second quarter clock. The stunning score gave Pittsburgh a 17-7 lead at half time, and the Steelers would eventually hold on thanks to some late-game heroics from Ben Roethlisberger and Santonio Holmes.

31 Jan 1993: Wide receiver Don Beebe of the Buffalo Bills (left) forces a fumble on defensive tackle Leon Lett of the Dallas Cowboys during Super Bowl XXVII at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The Cowboys won the game, 52-17.

31 Jan 1993: Wide receiver Don Beebe of the Buffalo Bills (left) forces a fumble on defensive tackle Leon Lett of the Dallas Cowboys during Super Bowl XXVII at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. The Cowboys won the game, 52-17.

Longest Fumble Return: Leon Lett, Dallas Cowboys (64)

Remember this iconic play? Lett would rather forget it, but his scoop and near-score still stands as the longest fumble return in Super Bowl history. With the Cowboys drilling the Bills late in Super Bowl XXVII, Lett picked up a fumble from Buffalo quarterback Frank Reich and began high-tailing toward the end zone.

He looked destined to score, but the big defensive lineman celebrated a little too soon. Bills receiver Don Beebe raced up behind him and knocked the ball away before Lett crossed the goal line, and a potential touchdown for the Cowboys turned into nothing more than a touchback. While Dallas still won by a 52-17 margin, Super Bowl XXVII is now remembered more for Lett’s mistake and Beebe’s hustle than anything else.

NEW ORLEANS, LA - FEBRUARY 03:  Jacoby Jones #12 of the Baltimore Ravens runs back a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown in the third quarter against the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl XLVII at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on February 3, 2013 in New Orleans, Louisiana.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

NEW ORLEANS, LA – FEBRUARY 03: Jacoby Jones #12 of the Baltimore Ravens runs back a 108-yard kickoff return for a touchdown in the third quarter against the San Francisco 49ers during Super Bowl XLVII at the Mercedes-Benz Superdome on February 3, 2013 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)

Longest Kickoff Return: Jacoby Jones, Baltimore Ravens (108)

Jacoby Jones established one of the more difficult Super Bowl records to break when he received David Akers’ second-half kickoff of Super Bowl XLVII and raced 108 yards for a touchdown.

The score gave the Ravens a 28-7 lead over the 49ers. Shortly into San Francisco’s ensuing drive, the power went out in the Superdome. You could say Jones’ return really sucked the life out of the building. Terrible puns aside, his 108-yard return figures to stand in the Super Bowl record books for a long time.

22 Jan 1989:  Wide receiver John Taylor #82 of the San Francisco 49ers makes a catch as defensive back Ray Horton #20 of the Cincinnati Bengals moves in during Super Bowl XXIII at the Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida.  The 49ers won the game 20-16.

22 Jan 1989: Wide receiver John Taylor #82 of the San Francisco 49ers makes a catch as defensive back Ray Horton #20 of the Cincinnati Bengals moves in during Super Bowl XXIII at the Joe Robbie Stadium in Miami, Florida. The 49ers won the game 20-16.

Longest Punt Return: John Taylor, San Francisco 49ers (45)

Here’s some useless trivia knowledge for you: There’s never been a punt return for a touchdown in Super Bowl history. In fact, there’s only been one return over 40 yards, and it came via John Taylor, who produced a 45-yard return during San Francisco’s win over the Bengals in Super Bowl XXIII.

The return actually came on a play where Taylor misread the punt, which sailed well over his head. He fielded the ball at his own 9-yard line and made up the lost yardage with a long return. Maybe Ted Ginn or Jordan Norwood—the likely punt returners in Super Bowl 50—will finally provide a touchdown.

Zach Kruse

About Zach Kruse

Zach is the associate editor at The Sports Daily. He also covers the NFL for Bleacher Report and CheeseheadTV.

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