World Series Game Four – Red Sox 3 Cardinals 0

I’m sorry, but I can’t really put into words this game. It was a monumental effort by an absolutely amazing team. They managed to rewrite the history books. Hell, they’re writing the new history books. Some extra history the Red Sox laid on us were the eight straight post-season games – a record. The first time four pitchers combined on a shutout (Game 4). Also, the Cardinals became the first team in the history of the World Series to trail at some point in every inning of every game (and only was tied for two out of the 36 total innings!).
The Hall of Fame is already making plans on what to feature.

> The jersey worn by Derek Lowe in clinching Game 4 of the World Series. Lowe was the first pitcher to win three clinching games in one postseason. [More history!]
> The bat Johnny Damon used in Game 4 as well as his cap from the Series.
> The bat World Series MVP Manny Ramirez used in Game 4 to tie the record for getting hits in consecutive World Series. [So close to history … oh well, he’ll get it next year!]
> The glove used by shortstop Orlando Cabrera, who did not make an error the entire postseason. [Paging Nomar…]
> The cap worn by ace Pedro Martinez, who threw seven shutout innings in Game 3. [Paging the Official Bank of the Boston Red Sox…]
> The spikes worn by Keith Foulke, the closer who was marvelous throughout the postseason and recorded the final out of Boston’s first championship since 1918. [Paging the statue builders about to get busy…]
> The spikes worn by Curt Schilling, who, gimpy right ankle and all, willed out a victory in Game 2 of the World Series. [Paging the Legend]
> The Hall of Fame is also expecting to receive a home jersey from David Ortiz, who had three walk-off hits in this postseason. Ortiz is also likely to provide a game bat from the World Series. [Paging the Hero]

If you would like a great, sensational game recap, you need to visit the eloquent Catbird in the Nosebleed Seats.

I watched the game last night and I was so happy when we won. So happy – an understatement. I watched the team celebrate, and I knew this is why we suffered through last year – for this. I can say with all honesty that if God asked me which year I would want to win (yes, hindsight is 20/20) – 2003 or 2004, I would pick 2004. I am just ashamed to be in the same division as the Baltimore Orioles right now, who engineered the departure of Johnny Pesky (Pesky is 86 years old and has been with the Red Sox since signing as a teenager – from player to coach to manager to coach to instructor. He was on the bench of the Boston Red Sox from a teenager up until the Orioles intervened) from the dugout, and therefore he was banished to the clubhouse for the end of the regular season and playoffs. Absolutely classless, and I will not be forgetting this when we take on the Black and Orange next year. (Sorry, Joe…)
I taped part of the game last night. I say part because for some reason, I could not set my VCR to EP, so it was on at SP, which is two hours worth of time. I taped every inning, and when nothing happened, would go back and erase said inning. It’s a quick tape, and pretty much gets everything. (Shoddy editing, though.) I have to say, when Foulke got the out and the celebrating ensued … then the Nike Commercial popped up, I got tears in my eyes again – yes, again, and even more so than last night. But I stayed strong. There’s no crying in baseball.
“That’s beer coming from my head. I do not cry. I’m a true modern American male.” -Theo Epstein, after winning the World Series. Sorry, Theo. It was obvious to the writer it was tears.
Is there not anyone else more deserving than Keith Foulke to be on the mound? And is it sheer geniust that Terry Francona stuck to his guns and did what he always did – Doug Mientkiewicz at first, Pokey Reese at second. Mark my words – Theo Epstein is General Manager of the Red Sox for at least thirty years, and Terry Francona is manager for at least seven more.
Johnny Damon had a lead-off homerun, and Trot Nixon doubled home two runs in the third. Jason Marquis was lucky he got past five – the Sox as always stranded baserunners (not that I am complaining…) and it seemed like Tony La Russa (manager, Cardinals) didn’t want to have the ingominy of all four of his starters not last through the fifth. The record had already been set at three with Woody Williams, Matt Morris, and Jeff Suppan.

It’s slowly starting to sink in. I’ll just randomly start smiling, and I’ll know why. The Red Sox won the World Series. Every time I pop in the tape I made, I don’t think I’ll be able to get by it without getting choked up. I thought I would never love the 2004 team as much as I did the 2003 team, but once David Ortiz hit that game-winner against Anaheim, I knew I loved this team more. And they won. That’s love for you.
Boston Red Sox – 2004 World Champions. You deserved it.